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mother who had heard a series of stories i had done from her city, her home city in 2008, and remembered them all. remembered them with incredible detail. and she said, you know, you did fine. you got the news. but there's so much more. you missed a lot. you could have gotten a lot more, and i couldn't agree more. as journalist, you go to cover dramatic and developing news but the most important thing is to go back and to get a deeper sense of the story and try to understand what's really going on. >> you feel that you got the deeper sense of the story here? >> i got a deeper sense but this is anen believably complicated case. that's one of the reasons i tried to peel back the layers in history leading up to a single day. it's like that old saying, there's seven million stories in the naked city. you good to a city in the developing world and there's 13 million or 20 million. it's an incredibly complicated place, place that often seems nonsensical, until you get there, and then you're totally absorbed in it, and as soon as you go away ceases to make sense. >> would you go to karachi tomo
but it is on the main drag right before her city hall i will think of the name may be before the end of the evening. probably not. [laughter] >> i enjoyed your book american stories i a understand only basically they were derived from newspaper headlines? >> from going to wherever i was in reporting the story. newspaper headlines maybe that is how i found out about them? >> there must have an idea is you pursued that did not turn into a story. were there any that came out of the process? >> i went to a place because somebody phone to me or wrote to me a letter i usually ended up with that story. almost always been just about everything is in their better or worse. >> do you have any insight with u.s. providence -- president has of preference for a dog as a family pet? [laughter] maybe they never met a cat that they like. [applause] more questions? >> as a little christmas gift could you give us the recitation of the todd akin poem? >> with murdoch. let me see if i haven't. if you think about what would happen if you would call in a political consultant who specializes with women's issues to say hav
a series of stories that i had done from her city, her home city back in 2008 and remembered them all and remember them with incredible detail. she said you did fine, you got the news, but there's so much more. you missed a lot. you could've gotten a lot more, and i couldn't agree more. as a journalist i go to these different places, you go to cover dramatic and developing news, but the most important thing i think is to go back and to get a deeper sense of the store and try to understand what's really going on in a complicated place. >> and you feel you got the deeper sense of the story? >> i got a deeper sense of the story but this is an unbelievably complicated place. that's one of the reasons why i try to lay her back -- peel back the layers. when you think about, like the old saying like there's 7 million stories of the naked city. if you go to a city in the developing world and there's 13 or 15 or 20 million, it's a complicated place. it's a place that often seemed completely nonsensical into you get there, and then you're totally in scarfed in and when you go away can't it seem
her city, the home city back in 2008. and remember them all, remember them with incredible detail. and she said you did fine. you got the news. but there is so much more. you missed a lot, you could've gotten a lot more. i couldn't agree more. as a journalist, i go to these different places. you go to cover dramatic and developing the strength of the important thing is to go back and to get a deeper sense of the story. to try to understand what is really going on in the complicated place like that. >> do you feel that you have got to deeper sense of the story? >> i definitely got a deeper sense of the story. this is an unbelievably complicated place. i try to peel back the layers leading up to a single day. we think about the fact that there are -- it's like that saying about 7 million stories. well, you go to a city in the developing world and it's like only layers. it's a complicated place. it seems completely nonsensical until you get there. then as soon as you go away again, it uses to make sense. it is also rewarding to understand some of the dynamics. >> would you go there t
and writing their book. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles to her, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> here's a look at some books that are being published this week.
a sharecropper but had her sights on the big city. as you say there were quarters and the lives they lead, led, some of that has been glamorized but reading your book, they worked day and night sometimes for three hours, so i got a real view of that. the other thing i liked as you pull in the different characters and put them in different places you also talked about the black newspapers of the day. tell us how important they were. >> the first lady's family ended up in chicago quite early. great migration you often think about after world war i. her great-grandmother was there by 1908. folks came in the 20s and 30s and as a resource they did live in chicago, lucky to have the chicago defender which was -- which advocated -- calls people to move north. the newspaper from that time gives you a portrait of what life was like and it was invaluable. >> i think we are going to move to our q&a at this point in time. let's give rachel a big hand first. >> thank you. [applause] >> you are welcome to move to the mike. >> hello. i don't know if this is gone. there we are. i am from a presidential family
affordable housing and she's very well qualified. she began her career as a housing coordinator for the city of santa barbara, rising to become the city's housing and redevelopment manager. and i would point out, santa barbara is a magnificent part of my state. i have a beautiful state. and they didn't have much in the way of moderate income housing, and i think it was very important the work that she did. she moved on to eden housing, a nonprofit affordable housing developer, where she developed over 400 homes as a project manager. and she took over as executive director. later she joined bridge housing as vice president, and in 1996, she took the helm of that organization as its president and chief executive. bridge is the largest nonprofit developer of affordable mixed-income and mixed-use developments in california. and while she was there, carol oversaw the creation of over 13,000 affordable homes for more than 35,000 californians and programs that helped one-fourth of their residents advance to homeownership. because she knew that was the goal. homeownership even after all we've been t
a conversationalist and became a striking young woman then she had her debut in new york. she came back a few years later. nothing could out do the flurry of excitement that hetty encountered the fall of 1860. this city shimmered with the news as the prince of wales was coming. a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society trimmed their moustaches women spent hours and at 9:00 p.m. friday october 12th couples who had paid $10 apiece arrived at the academy of music. men with white ties and women with hoopskirt its with brocade, sat tin, lead tools, gave special nods to precisely at 10:00 p.m. the orchestra played god save the queen and the small prints stepped into the room. nearly 3,000 of new york's finest citizens rushed to meet him and with the rash the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously the aghast rushed to follow they had lobster salad, pat day and filled glasses with champagne. at 2:00 with their dance floor fixed eager females waited their turn for a dance and finally the young woman was tapped. stunning in her low cut white gown with pink and her arms covered wit
herself, was married to a doctor. and the medical community and the city that based on her weekend.yours and nurses at the age toward, dr. paul wilbur dang and others. and they didn't know it at that point whether they were taking home the infection to the children's come in to their families, but they stood their ground and began to treat the sick and the ailing president he were our children, the brothers were part of san francisco family. and that msn is the san francisco values his solo. we take care of our own here. and the rest of the country was rejecting aids patients, dumping them in the city, putting them on airplanes to be flown to san francisco in their dying days, san francisco took been in and took care of them. so we take care of our own. that's the value here. one of the key people who get that going back to the 1960s and very glad he's here with us today, dr. david smith who is the brave, young or in the 1960s is set up to the medical establishment in this town when they were not treating the young who are on the streets, the runaways who are swarming into seem to
whose family would in the take care of her. that's true tonight in this city as well. >> what does your program specifically do to help kids who are victims of the sex trade? >> so the question is what does covenant house do for kids who are victims of the sex trade? also what we do individually with the young people and the public policy questions we work to tackle so first the latter. we work with other ngo leaders across the country either as participants in or leading state-based coalitions, improving legislation that protects survivors of trafficking or the champions, the antitrafficking work that's going on at the federal and state level so in alaska last year, the fbi gave cove inapt -- covenant house was given a community partner award for the work we do to identify trafficking and prosecute it in pennsylvania, and several weeks ago, covenant house in philadelphia led a coalition that successfully championed new safe harbor legislation that helped victims of sex trafficking, and that would be true throughout the united states, and worse in latin america, working in mexico, guate
further than her own district of greenwich village to see the impact of freezing a city in amber. her home district, which was affordable when she and her husband lived there in the 1950s, has turned into a place that is, where townhouses start at $5 million a pop, and only hedge fund managers need apply. that's what happens when you turn off the chain of building new housing. now, one of the reasons why it's so important to furture our cities and -- nurture our cities, and, indeed, allowing more buildings is one way, is the environment. and i'm going to end by telling a story of a young harvard college graduate, beautiful spring day in 1844 went for a walk in the woods outside of concord, and he did a little fishing, and the fishing was good. and then he came to cook the fish into a chowder. it is boston, after all. [laughter] and the wind came and flicked the flames that he was using to nearby dry grass, and a fire started, and it spread, and it spread. and eventually, it turned into a raging inferno which burn withed down more than 300 acres of prime woodland. in his own day this man wa
. in which hundreds died from hideous scalds. the steamer, launch inside new york city on christmas day 1850, did not reach san francisco for the first time until september 17th, 1851. blasting her whistle, laying a wide trail of foam and thrashing her bad les with -- paddles with abandon, the independence glided toward long wharf, an edges tension between holdson's peer and quaint street wharf. the cloud of white steam hanging above her was normal. in such noncondensing engines as her, the exhaust steam escapes into the air like a virginia city hot spring. so i'm going to leave out the ship wreck which is pretty horrible. not to spoil your evening, it is an amazing feat. tom, actually, swam the people ashore on his back through swarms of sharks. just an absolute hero. ninety people he was credited with saving. so i think about 150 died, and then they were ship wrecked for a while. but he came back to san francisco, and the wounds i talked about, that's when he was really made his mark, and then he went back to sea and came back in 1859. now this, i thought you might enjoy a little tiny bit
years. [applause] are scum her supervisor, foy. [applause] for the city who are patient enough to go through the book signing line, just prior to the event this evening coming in at this wonderful woman to see woman is here with us today. she's the best selling "new york times" best-selling author. it is a gentleman, please join me in welcoming calista gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a very special guest. i know that if i were simply to get the typical dinner circuit introduction speaker did newt gingrich, the one where you list every accomplishment. i promise you it he here all night and even newt would get bored. his list of achievements and politics is involvement of lifelong learning. his expertise in national security matters, business ventures, philanthropic endeavors, dozens of books he's written just the list goes on and on. allow me for the moment to present that all of us here are well acquainted with the important milestones in the life of one newt gingrich. i want to focus in some part on the future. but i sincerely hope is misplaced and it as it relates to i
the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he missed her. she was pregnant and she had a miscarriage. he missed her and he bought her some gloves. then he went home to monticello city could be this way. every winter the revolutionary war, george washington suffering through the freezing weather valley forge was martha washington with her white bonnet. by starting the first ladies beget new insights on on the presidents and new insights on other things. apropos to my book washington -- -- alexander hamilton one of the chapters in the book talks about hamilton's history of womanizing. for example bill clinton was not the first and bill clinton was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior in high office. there's a long history of it and arnold schwarzenegger and john edwards, david petraeus had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read for example letters written by martha washington going to the winter camp, she didn't complain about the weather. she didn't complain about the harsh conditions but she did complain about one thing. there was
love her. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicle's tour, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> now, james gustave speth argues that building a democratic and ec lookically-sustainable economic system will bring about a new wave of prosperity. this program is about an hour, 40. [applause] >> thank you, john, and thank all of you for braving the weather and coming out, and thanks especially to the co-sponsors who joined ips in this and the afl-cio for making in the room available. it's wonderful to see so many people here and so many old friends here. so thank you all very much. i will try to not talk for too long. i have my watch. i didn't have it one time when i was speaking at yale, and i'm delighted to see some of my students from yale here, and i ran over real badly, and i apologized for not having my watch and letting things get out of hand, and students said, that east okay, dean speth, there's a calendar on the wall behind you. [laughter] it's good to be here, also, on the first anniversary of occupy wall street, a momentous event. i want to tell
was the distillery. two doors up was the code we have her, cold rain station half the book really that the bloodstained ground of murderous corner. in early may, virginia city for a two-month visit to visit tobrex, handsome brother john briggs, a close friend and hannibal and neo-nazi former class may. twain had passed our set at stalls ground-floor barbershop in basements and bass on montgomery street. a third affair he likened to just save being on main street in hannibal in meeting the old familiar faces. the extensive chunk of granite dome is the montgomery block dominated the southeast corner of montgomery and washington streets. numbers 722 and 724, montgomery. identical gresh tobacco warehouse, melodeon theater and now the turkish bath were trained parboiled the fire ms. sawyer install, another good friend. twain study discards them have to do of dirt. it was cold and sweaty in his path. he took a swig. a few droplets caught in this horseshoe mustache and he left them there. he found as he played poker, smoking one of his wheeling long sandwich report that the could kill it
, a renowned citizen of our state, and city, and known as the queen of creole quizine. she -- cuisine. we wanted the senate to congratulate her on that milestone and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the resolution will be received and properly referred. the senator from pennsylvania. mr. casey: thank you, mr. president. tonight as we -- today i should say as we confront a whole range of difficult issues at the end of this year and at the end of the congress, we should also be reminded that we have fighting men and women serving for us all around the world. we think especially tonight of those serving in afghanistan, and those who served part of that time in iraq. at various times we've come to the floor and recited the chaims of those who were killed -- names of those killed in action and tonight i'm i'm joined by my colleague, senator tom to read -- toomey who read the names of those who as lincoln said gave their last full measure of devotion to their country, those killed in action in afghanistan over parts of 2011 and 2012. i'll turn and yield the floor to my colleague, senat
city. they could do with the capability and can share with you with all due respect to our intelligence into her security systems if al qaeda had wanted to attack in tel aviv the israeli tower, they would've been able to do it. but they chose to attack here in the u.s., here in washington d.c. why? because they wanted to send a message and for that matter i hope that the united states of america and whoever we elect him will take a leadership decision playmobil decision. maybe it's not popular, but it would be more decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. i don't know how many of you have followed the wiki makes report, that something very interesting popped up from wikileaks. when you go look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they were afraid more than i speak to people in saudi arabia and egypt, in jordan. so for that matter we'll have to take action. if the u.s. will decide to sit idly by and to watch and pray and take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. the ability retaliation not only
and to read and encounter her and i suppose love her. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicle's for go to c-span.org/localcontent. with a month left in 2012 many publications are putting together a third year end list of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction elections. these nonfiction titles were included in the new york times 100 notable books of 2012. and barack obama:the story david maraniss, associate editor of the washington post present a history of president barack obama's family. charles murray of the american enterprise institute argues a growing divide between the upper and lower class goes beyond economics differences in coming apart:the state of white america 1960-2010. in victory, the triumphant game revolution, linda hirschman presenting history of the gay-rights movement. david nassau chronicles the life and career of the father of the kennedy political dynasty in the patriarch, remarkable life and turbulent times of joseph kennedy. history professor at duke university examined haiti from i
kennedy there. the church bells start to charm over the city. on the plane, there are three compartments. interfirst sits the press and staff and kennedy's secretaries are sitting there sobbing. in the last compartment jacqueline kennedy is sitting next to her husband. in the center compartment where lyndon johnson is sitting in the president's share there is an air -- we know what he is planning because he is making a list on little note pad on air force one that have the heading air force one and he writes on one of them, one staff, two leaders, a meeting with staff, meeting with the cabinet immediately and congressional leadership. we know about incidents that occurred during a flight, in one case just before it took off. when lyndon johnson calls robert kennedy. these are two men who have hated each other all their lives. at the time kennedy is having lunch he had a house in virginia, a big white old house, there is a long green lawn that goes down to a swimming pool and robert kennedy is sitting at table with robert morgan who had been the u.s. attorney for new york, and two things
very recently because the place is not working the city kept saying. she had a weak store and one son was at the school of economics and her other son was at williams and she was doing fine. there was a guy who saved everything to open a sushi restaurant and now the whole block is gone because it was deemed as not being of value. the thing is you don't know how to recognize what is valuable use that had spent time value to the city we are living in now. we don't recognize it, but there is all this talk again in the last 10 years or so about publid maybe thinking that there is other value to the street friend since. well in that conversation, this conversation, it's all in the same room. we are in the same room now saying okay there is value. if you close the streets people don't walk on it and it doesn't work any more. how they think and feel about a place as the value the place. so i think we are going to understand i am hoping and let's say 20 years that there are uses we need to propagate and help continue rather than create a new . >> one of the things you point out in this book a
from hideous scalds. the steamer launched in new york city on christmas day, 1850 did not reach san francisco for the first time until september 17, 1850 one. the whistle a wide trail of foam and crashing her paddles with abandon, the independence and glided toward longworth, extension of clay and commercial street between alison's peer and clay street wharf. steam was screaming to the gauge cox, the cloud of white steam hanging above was normal. in such non condensing inches, exhaust steam escapes into the air like a virginia city hot spring. i will leave out the shipwreck which is pretty horrible not to spoil your evening, an amazing feat. , actually swam people ashore on his back through swarms of shark -- 90 people he was credited with saving. i think about 150 died and were shipwrecked for a while but he came back to san francisco, and really made his mark and went back to see and came back in 1859. i thought you might enjoy this, chapter 1, that was the prologue. this is about when dave broderick came to san francisco to start a fire company and he was so charismatic that -- t
on her facebook wall, or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> i am pleased to announce this month at the city of albany has the honor of hosting the time warner cable c-span local content vehicles cities to it. this program travels the country to capital cities that featured the history and literary life of these communities. albany was chosen because we are a city rich in history and in is resting local their community.
. all we need is her name address and we could even ship it to another in another city or state it does not cost you anything. $39.99 plus tax today and it gets shipped within 48 hours. anybody who calls after theext two hours i would say in all likelihood will go into extended delivery. they may have to wait a little bit longer to get their kindle- fire.and here is what you get.you get the usb that is how charge it stylus earbudsa $25 gift certificate. aaron berger is esses are electronic expert. he has sold every single tablet (...) >>guest: known to man, womanild >>host: that is not an exaggeration. >>guest: we have got to sell a lot of great tablets but not more popular than this. it probably has been the most popular today's special i have done with 25,000 out the door. and it is 3:00 p.m. in the afternoon. --4:00 p.m.. it is the lowest price we have ever done on the can pole, we have sold the kindle-fire before- a-kid pole. kindle 13 do on any tablet for the rest of thef you want to do email watch a video, download movies applications this is it. this is the one. the top sel
, an elevating experience to read it and encounter her. and i suppose, love her. >> on a recent visit to albany, new york, with the help of our partner, time warner cable, booktv explored the literary and cultural atmosphere of the city. albany, known as one of the most populace cities in the u.s. in 1810, is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state university of new york, the albany the law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal j
that people are doing in northeast ohio to rebuild the city's housing market. some of the most innovative ideas in the country have come out of cleveland in the land bank and housing network. after i sat down with her and shared stories of big banks allowing f.h.a. properties in cincinnati to fall into decay, f.h.a. updated its servicing rules to hold these banks accountable. f.h.a. selected cleveland, akron and canton for its next round of note sales. this program allows for the sale of distressed and delinquent f.h.a. mortgages to parties that will rehabilitate the loans in order to help stabilize these neighborhoods. because of her many years of experience in housing and in real estate and her commitment to addressing the crucial issues facing today's hardest-hit cities, big cities and smaller cities alike and what's happened to these housing markets i urge a "yes" vote on the galante nomination. mr. president, i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from south dakota. mr. johnson: i ask unanim
the future. and to show how brave rosa parks was, an incident that deeply affected her happened just a few months before. in the summer of 1955, the murder of emmett till, 14 year-old african-american boy, lived in chicago with his mother. and she wanted him out of the city for the summer. she sent him to be with his aunt and uncles and cousins of mississippi. one night, a white mob dragged him out of bed. they said -- his mother had taught him, and he was a starter, but when he stuttered he should whistle. he ended up in the bottom of the tallahatchie river. when his body was dredged up and sent back to chicago, his mother did something incredibly courageous. she said she wanted the casket open for the wage and the funeral. she wanted the world to see the ravages of racism, the brutality of bigotry. thousands streamed by his casket and saw. and then jet magazine, another black publication, had a photograph of his mutilated head, and they were actually published and they were seared into the history and consciousness of this country. she had something very important to teach the press of t
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)